Dorte Verner photographs and writes on development, including poverty reduction and climate. Dorte Verner is a photographer sensitive to social and environment issues and give voice to people who likely never would make it to the news.
Dorte Verner photographs and writes on development, including poverty reduction and climate. Dorte Verner is a photographer sensitive to social and environment issues and give voice to people who likely never would make it to the news.
The people of Harbor Island, a tiny little island known as Briland, are extraordinary. Their laid-back rhythm and kindness make the island a true gem of the Bahamas. Brilanders live by the sea, and many of the sea, close to the unimaginably perfect coral-pink sand beach, some in colorful cottage houses in Dunmore Town, and get around by foot or in golf carts. The colorful island is only 5.5 km long by a 2.5 km wide—but this Caribbean gem punches well above its weight. I visited during the pandemic, and the island was a Covid-19 green zone. However, most travelers and tourists stayed away, leading to hardship and food insecurity on the island, despite the island being a part of the world’s luxury travel scene. While schools were closed in many other parts of the world, children on Briland walked to school in immaculate uniforms and their hair in braids. In the early evenings, when people elsewhere were staying home, Brilannders were active chatting on porches, playing dominos, or preparing delicious food or drinks. The Brilanders and talented Haitian migrants were always happy to talk and taught me much about their life and place.  When Briland occasionally shows up in magazines, it is mostly when princes, princesses, and movie stars visit. This series is about the people of Briland and their unique lives on Habor Island. Thank you all.
this image is used to maintain space
this image is used to maintain space